Retaining Your Clients Muscle & Strength During A Fat Loss Phase with Stefan Ianev

So, what's the best way to help your clients lose body fat while retaining muscle mass and strength while dieting or in a fat loss phase?

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Today we’re going to talk about how to maintain muscle mass and strength with your clients, while in a fat loss phase or dieting. We’re also going to show you a very effective strategy that we use successfully with many of our clients.

 

What’s In This Session?

  • The problem with prolonged dieting (0:44)
  • How to counter the affects of prolonged dieting (1:14)
  • Slowing the diet down (1:52)
  • Basic guidelines for client caloric deficits (2:00)
  • Refeed days for certain clients (2:36)
  • “Diet breaks” (3:35)
  • Recap (4:17)

 

Show Notes & Resources Mentioned


The Full Transcript

So, what's the best way to help your clients lose body fat while retaining muscle mass and strength?

Well, in this video, when I show you a very effective strategy that we've use successfully with many of our clients.

And what's up everybody, I'm Stefan from thefitnessboss.com, helping you take charge those 166 hours that your clients try to undo when they're not training with you. We published brand new videos every single week, so make sure that you subscribe to our channel. And if you like this video, we'd greatly appreciate it if you gave it a thumbs up and let us know what you think the comments below.

Now, in today's video we're going talk about how to maintain muscle mass and strength, while in a fat loss phase.

We know that prolonged dieting causes a reduction of the metabolic rate and reduction in the total daily energy expenditure. So not only does it becomes progressively harder to lose fat over time, but there's also a decline of the anabolic hormone such as testosterone, which makes it progressively easier to lose muscle tissue versus fat mass. So the longer someone stays in a diet, and also the leaner someone is, the more catabolic they start becoming in muscle tissue, and less catabolic in fat tissue. So they start to progressively lose more muscle, and less fat.

So, how do we go about countering that? Well firstly, if you slow you dieting down, studies have shown if you lose weight over a longer period of time, you actually spare more lean muscle tissue and you maintain strength plays if the faster you drive or the more drastic a lot of production is the more likely you are to lose muscle and to lose strength. Furthermore, the faster you diet the greater compensation of metabolism. So when you get out of your diet you're more likely put that fat back on. Whereas if you diet slowly, there's less a compensation of metabolic rate. Also you retain more muscle. But once you come out of the diet, you're less likely to put the fat back on.

So the first point I want to make is make sure we slow dieting down. Okay, the leaner someone is, generally the lower the caloric deficit needs to be. So, if you have a very overweight person, you can put them in a 30 to 35 percent energy deficit. But, when it comes to leaner person, you probably want to be going around 15 to 20 percent calorie deficit at most. Because if you increase the calorie deficit beyond that, you increase the likelihood of that person losing lean muscle tissue.

Now also, we can incorporate regular refeed days. And what those refeed days do is actually mitigate the rate of metabolic slowdown, but also mitigate that catabolic state that the body goes into with a prolonged diet. Now refeed days typically take place a couple times a week, and what they're used for is basically to offset the decline in these negative metabolic adaptations.

Refeed days, in and of themselves, are not sufficient to reverse the negative metabolic adaptations once those metabolic adaptations have come on. But there are effective for mitigating the onset or the rate at which those adaptations come on. So that's another strategy to use is regularly implementing refeed days, and that becomes more important, especially for lean individuals. So when you have a male, for example 10 percent or less, or when you have a female 16 percent or less.

If you have a more overweight client, refeed days are probably not as significant. Just like using a smaller caloric deficit is not as significant. Because when someone has a high amount of fat mass, they're naturally going to spare more lean tissue. Okay, the body senses high fat mass as an energy reserve. So, it's more likely going to oxidize or mobilize fat as a primary fuel source, versus lean tissue. But when someone becomes leaner and leaer, and now they have a smaller amount of fat mass, the body's proportionally going to catabolize more lean tissue instead of fat mass. So this is when it becomes important to closing the calorie deficit a little bit an also incorporate regular refeed days.

Now, the third strategy that we can implement here, as I mentioned refeed days alone will not actually reverse negative metabolic adaptations. To actually reverse negative metabolic adaptations, you need to take someone out and diet for longer periods. The minimum is three (3) days, but optimally you need about 8 to 14 days. With eight to 14 days of taking someone out of their diet, you'll raise leptin levels and then you bring up thyroid levels, metabolism, and also anabolic hormones like testosterone. So it will reverse the body from that catabolic state, from that state where the body is conserving energy, and it's tearing down lean tissue, and you'll allow the body, once you go back on your diet to start losing again at the calorie deficit that you were previously losing at.

Just to recap. To maintain as much muscle and strength as possible while dieting or a fat loss phase, first thing is to slow down your dieting. Especially for leaner clients, that means using a smaller caloric deficit. Second thing you can do, expecially for leaner clients is to do is to incorporate regular refeed days. So a couple times a week, typically twice a week, every third or fourth day, increase calories back to baseline. And the third thing we can do is periodically use what's called "Diet Breaks". So take your client out of their diet for a longer periods. Between 3 days up to two weeks, so basically - 14 days. And Typically those diet breaks will come every six to eight weeks or even sooner, depending on how lean the client is and how often they crash.

And that will do it for today's video. We'll see you in the next video. If you like this video, make sure you hit the Like button and definitely subscribe to the fitness boss channel. We post videos like this every week, providing you with tips and practical tools to getting ahead with business building, client training and social media.

Today you talked about how to maintain muscle mass and strength while in a fat loss phase by slowing down your dieting, incorporating regular refeeds and having "diet breaks".

If you've got any questions or comments, Make sure to leave a comment below as We'd love to hear from you. Thanks for watching and I'll see you next time.

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